E.g., 11/13/2019
E.g., 11/13/2019
Free for GALA Members
$60.00 for Non-Members

Details

Considering diving into the lucrative conference interpreting marketplace? Already there but need more guidance? This presentation explores how language services companies can work with conference technology solution providers to offer value-added services and grow their business exponentially. Find out how to work with buyers of language services who are increasingly more sophisticated, more demanding in their conferencing needs and who have a higher expectation for quality high-end technology. Developing the right partnerships can help companies compete more effectively by providing critical resources to meet these demands, staying one-step ahead of the game.

Emma Mas Jones

Emma joined Conference Rental in June 2015 bringing with her valuable experience from the language and event services industries in non-profit international organizations and multinational corporations in Europe, Asia and America. Her experience working in public and private sectors in culturally diverse environments with high-pressure deliverables makes her a great addition to the team. Emma has held senior level positions and advisory roles for various international organizations including as Head of Language Services for the 2010 Singapore Youth Olympic Games, Senior Advisor at the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympic Games and as a consultant on various language services projects for the International Olympic Committee. These roles involved detailed planning for successful event execution, negotiating with high-profile clients and stakeholders and leading large teams and operations in complex set-ups. She has also worked in large corporations developing localization programs, global teams and operations. Originally from Spain, Emma holds a Post-graduate Diploma in Law and a Bachelor’s Degree in Applied Languages from London and speaks German, Italian and basic Mandarin in addition to English and Spanish. She currently resides in San Francisco Bay Area, USA.

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