E.g., 08/21/2019
E.g., 08/21/2019

eTranslation – the Machine Translation Tool Built by the European Commission for All Europeans

Philippe Gelin

Thursday, 11 April, 2019
Free for GALA Members
Free for Non-Members

Details

The European Commission has probably the biggest translation service in the world.  In order to meet the ever growing request for translations, the European Commission built its own machine translation tool.  In 2017 the tool was extended and improved using AI-based technology; there now are machine translation engines for all the 24 official languages of the European Union, including Icelandic and Norwegian.  The new system, called eTranslation, is trained on the unique output of the translators of the EU institutions over the past few decades. Thanks to the Connecting Europe Facility programme (CEF Digital), the system is now open to all public administrations and pan-European digital public services across Europe, Iceland and Norway.

The session will present the eTranslation tool, and how it can help lower language barriers across Europe. You will see typical examples of its strengths, usages and limitations, and how administrations across Europe can use it. This will be followed by an explanation of current and proposed future funding opportunities related to this service. There will be a Q&A session on the service and how public administrations at local and regional can connect.

Philippe Gelin

Within the European Commission, Philippe Gelin is in charge of the multilingualism sector in the Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, developing European wide policies including the funding programmes in research and deployments of language technologies. Philippe is originally from Belgium, where he received an Engineering degree with a specialisation in Artificial Intelligence. He received his PhD from the Ecole Polytechnique Féderale de Lausanne on Video Indexation by Speech Recognition. After working for two years in California for a high tech Japanese Company and two years in a Belgian Startup, he entered the European Commission in 2002 where he worked in several ICT domains. Since March 2018, he has been in charge of the multilingualism sector with the aim of lowering the language barrier across Europe.