E.g., 11/18/2019
E.g., 11/18/2019

LISA/OSCAR standards now available

When LISA ceased operations on February 28, its portfolio of standards was left in a certain degree of limbo for legal reasons. GALA is now happy to announce that the former LISA has released its portfolio of standards—Translation Memory eXchange (TMX), Term Base eXchange (TBX), Segmentation Rules eXchange (SRX), Global information management Metrics eXchange - Volume (GMX-V), and XML Text Memory (xml:tm)—under a Creative Commons Attribution license, meaning that they will continue to be available under an open license to the localization community. While LISA designated ETSI as its legal successor for its standards (a step required by LISA’s statutes), the LISA Board and ETSI have agreed that the existing standards may be posted in this open license as a repository for the community. (Note that this donation means that LISA, even though defunct, does still retain copyright under this arrangement and is not releasing the use of trademarked logos or other trademarked assets, except for the names of the standards, without separate agreement.) As part of this arrangement, I—as the former director of standards at LISA and the Standards Coordinator for the GALA Standards Initiative—was authorized by the LISA administration and Board to update the standards to reflect the new license agreement terms and to make them available to the public through appropriate online mechanisms. These documents are now available at www.gala-global.org/lisa-oscar-standards (with a mirror at www.ttt.org/oscarStandards) as a permanent repository of the versions current as of the time when LISA ceased operations. The versions posted at these URLs are technically identical to those originally published by LISA and all changes (updates to URLs and the copyright/license notes) are clearly marked in the documents, thus allowing implementers to easily identify the changes that have been made. It is GALA’s hope that by providing these specifications to the public, we can help resolve the situation that for some months now no official copies of these specifications have been available even though the LISA/OSCAR standards have continued to be used and cited widely. Having them available should help implementers reference them and use them in ongoing projects. We invite feedback on any errors or issues that may be found with these copies of the LISA standards.

randomness